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1) BBC News | BUSINESS | Group hugs increase profits: Giving your colleagues a hug first thing in the morning really can boost profits, judging by the experiences of one company. Workers at Farrelly Facilities and Engineering begin and end the day with an embrace. It's produced a happier workforce. Since they started this routine, at the end of 1999, profits at the heating and air conditioning business have more than doubled. One of the directors, John Farrelly, told BBC News Online that none of the 50 workers was forced to cuddle.

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2) SAP has the last laugh - Tech News - CNET.com: As SAP, Europe's biggest software maker, marks its 30th anniversary this week, its combative chief executive has cause for a certain satisfaction. Throughout the rise of the New Economy bubble in late 1999 and 2000, CEO Hasso Plattner had to battle charges that SAP was a dinosaur left behind in the explosive growth of the Internet. The company, which Plattner created with four colleagues from IBM, had made its name with big corporate planning systems that were a byword for technical excellence and user unfriendliness, requiring armies of consultants and months of preparation to make them work.

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3) ERP II SAP/Oracle Escalation Wake-up Call: Some enterprises with large-scale SAP/Oracle systems have experienced an Oracle DBMS bug, which has exposed problems with the vendors' support escalation processes. In the complex world of ERP II, enterprises with large-scale implementations are likely to experience difficulties that expose flaws in vendors' support and quality assurance processes. Therefore, enterprises should become more proactive with respect to their system support and management. The critical support and escalation issues illustrated by the Oracle DBMS bug will have major ramifications on the credibility of the ERP II Unix market to support large-scale business operations.

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4) SAP’s Application Server Move Will Be "Massively Unsuccessful": Speaking at Information Age's Collaborative Commerce conference in London (Jan. 31 - Feb. 1, 2002), Fred Meyer (chief product strategist at application integration vendor Tibco) outlined the role of packaged applications such as SAP's enterprise resource planning (ERP) suite, mySAP.com, in the future of Web services. "There will still be a role for packaged applications behind the firewall," says Meyer, "but the complexity of these systems makes it impossible to build exhaustive integration across applications. The SAP mindset is that "we own this world so you can't touch this," which is why [the move into application development] will be massively unsuccessful."

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5) BizReport : Brits Do Their E-Shopping & E-Banking At Work: Internet usage figures published this morning show that the average Brit seems to do a lot more than simply work at their place of employment. Many, the NetValue analysis says, seem do a sizeable amount of online shopping and banking during their working hours. The October figures from the Internet research firm, which have just been expanded to cover work and university Internet access, show that 7.8 million Brits - 25% of the workforce - now access the Net from their place of employment. The problem, the research firm says, is that many also access the Net during their normal working hours - i.e., when they should be working.

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6) vnunet.com: SAP will back .Net: German software giant SAP AG said it would back both Microsoft's .Net strategy and rival Sun Microsystems' Java technology, rebutting reports this week that SAP would give its full backing to the Sun platform.SAP North American spokesperson Bill Wohl said a lot of interest had been created by the inaccurate and incomplete newspaper story. "We've spent the last 24 hours trying to balance it." According to Wohl, the UK's Financial Times got the story wrong; they relied on the wrong sources.

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7) Magician Loses Its Sparkling Touch: SAP, Europe's largest software maker, had been doing so well this year that it was starting to look more like the work of black magic than skilful management. That, at least, was the impression until recently when it became the last sizeable player in its devastated sector to issue a profit warning. No longer under the spell, analysts are now wondering whether the warning was a blip or the prelude to more serious problems for the German group. At the very least, they say, the episode has pointed to serious weaknesses that must be addressed quickly. One of them lies in SAP's handling of its last results announcement, which not only irritated investors but also fanned fears the group may have lost "visibility" on developments in its market...As Mr Ashton puts it: "You can have the biggest firework in the world, it is no good if you do not have the audience."

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8) SAP Chooses Sun Micro Platform Over Microsoft : SAP, Europe's biggest software group, has decided not to use Microsoft's .Net software platform and is instead backing a competing offering from Sun Microsystems. Hasso Plattner, SAP chief executive, will announce next week that the German group is to adopt Sun's J2EE architecture, a development platform for enterprise software based on the Java programming language, to run SAP software. SAP's move is likely to be a blow to Microsoft, as the German group has one of the largest customer bases of any business software developer.

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9) Work Together, Stay in Place: Learn how some smart organizations and quick learners are working virtually, efficiently, and seamlessly around the globe today

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10) New software lets managers search e-mail | Computerworld News & Features Story: Managers everywhere will soon have the power to remotely look through employee e-mail boxes, search for common words and even delete employee e-mail without notification, thanks to software from MicroData Software Inc. Version 2 of the software, called "Cameo," is scheduled to be released next week. Cameo is a rules-based system that allows managers or administrators using Microsoft Corp. Exchange 5.5 or Exchange 2000 e-mail servers to block, delete, search and automatically route e-mail, MicroData said.

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11) ZDNet: Sm@rt Partner - Answerthink acquires SAP expertise: ...Roughly 60 SAP gurus will move from Condor to Answerthink. Each SAP team member has an average of 15 years' consulting experience and more than six years of implementation experience, according to Answerthink...

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12) Inside Job: Want to find one area where Internet technology is delivering more than expected? Look within. Intranets are boosting efficiency and creativity, and changing work patterns. Here are seven steps to the ultimate intranet.

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13) Culture Shock: Traditional Cultural Patterns Surprise Product Developers : In yesterday’s one-size-fits-all world, a company could often migrate something that was a hit in the U.S. or Europe by tweaking its language and advertising and funneling a lot of money into local marketing efforts. Germany’s Mercedes-Benz, for example, traded on its reputation for building highly engineered automobiles to drive into markets the world over. Japan’s Sony Corp. found that its knack for building compact, economical, and reliable electronics, such as the Walkman, struck a chord around the globe. Coca-Cola Co. and Philip Morris’s Marlboro cigarettes traded on their "American-ness" to create large foreign followings.

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14) ZDNet: Enterprise: Microsoft: Big plans for Great Plains: Microsoft to rewrite Great Plains' apps in two years in C#. It's a familiar scenario: Microsoft Corp. settles into an inauspicious market toehold as competitors pay no heed – only to wake a few years later to find themselves obscured by the company's long shadow. It happened with Windows and Office. Now, the plan is to make it happen with Great Plains Software Inc.'s business applications. The software became part of Microsoft's portfolio when it acquired Great Plains this year. "All the business software in the world will be replaced," said Microsoft VP David Vaskevitch, the mastermind behind the acquisition. "It will be a 10-, 15-, even a 20-year process. You can rewrite SAP [AG], but it will be 10 times easier to rewrite Great Plains."

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15) I2 Technologies lays off 587 workers: Struggling business-to-business and supply-chain software vendor i2 Technologies Inc. said it's laying off another 10% of its workforce, or 587 workers, in order to become profitable. It is the second round of layoffs for the Dallas-based company in the past four months. Like other business-to-business vendors, i2 is being hit by a slowdown in the economy and lower-than-expected sales. Furthermore, on Monday, i2 announced the departure of Reagan Lancaster, the company's president of worldwide field operations.

me : It is strange - these laying off numbers... - what were these 587 doing last week and who will do it next week !!!

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16) InternetNews - ASP News -- Summer of Love Among ERP Rivals?: One of the more startling innovations that SAP failed to announce at its most recent SAPPHIRE user conference came in a presentation that showed the unshowable: a heterogeneous environment that included SAP and, in full, copyrighted glory, the logos of its two archrivals, Oracle and PeopleSoft. The message was almost revolutionary. SAP will actively support integration with non-SAP applications, including those from its most bitter competitors. An unwritten rule has dominated the enterprise software market since punch card days: deny the existence of competing products and, against all evidence to the contrary, promote the idea that customers can and will standardize on a single enterprise vendor to run their myriad business processes.

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17) Economist.com : Big is Beautiful again: Suddenly, scale matters in the high-tech world. This story looks at the new vogue for big firms. Bosses of big high-tech companies have every reason to turn to prayer these days. One after another they are announcing dismal results. In spite of the bad news, big is starting to look beautiful again in the computer industry. Witness SAP, a large German software firm. Only a year ago, it was considered a has- been. Now the pendulum is swinging back. On July 19th, it announced second-quarter net profits 24% up on the same quarter last year. Customers, saturated with reports of dot-com deaths, are turning back to established companies such as SAP, as well as to Oracle and IBM. "I call this 'the return of gravity'," says Hasso Plattner, SAP’s chief executive.

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18) SAP Devouring Stars of Dot-Com Era: SAP AG (SAPG.DE) is taking share from rivals across a range of market segments and has surged to become the top supplier of the software businesses use to manage suppliers and purchasing, Co-Chief Executive Hasso Plattner said on Thursday. Speaking in the vindicated tone of an industry veteran still wounded by previous criticism that Europe's largest software maker had ``missed the Internet,'' Plattner said in an interview that SAP has recaptured the momentum smaller players once had. ``Hype, vision and perception are losing. Deliverables, execution and reality are winning among customers these days,'' Plattner told Reuters following a news conference at SAP's global marketing headquarters. ``We give customers confidence.''

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19) IHT: Red Bull: Dot-Com Survival Soda: If Mountain Dew is the drink of geeks and Gatorade the elixir of athletes, then Red Bull has emerged as the beverage of choice for dot- commers fighting for survival. Techies swear by this caffeinated drink of Thai origin. Red Bull's adherents, however, are too busy fighting for their jobs to consider such scientific sour grapes. Deadlines are approaching. Dot-coms are crashing everywhere. The soda began appearing in the United States around 1997, just in time for the dot-com frenzy that turned 80-hour work weeks and all-night programming frenzies into a normal part of high-tech culture.

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20) The 5 Keys to Supply Chain Success - In this section.... - CIO Magazine Jul 15,2001: Automating your supply chain is the most difficult software project you'll ever do.

1. Make the Sale to Suppliers 
2. Wean Your Employees off the Phone and Fax 
3. Prepare for Bad Information—At First 
4. Fix the Supply Chain Connection to ERP 
5. Defuse Functional Warfare 


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21) CNN.com - Facial-recognition tech has people pegged - July 17, 2001: Forget ID badges, passwords, and access cards. Pretty soon, to get in and out of your office you might start using something you can't forget or misplace: your face. Once the stuff of science fiction, facial recognition technology has started to appear in real-life buildings and public places. Setups consist of cameras that capture images of people who pose or simply walk by, and software that matches those pictures with those stored in a database. Electronic readers can be affixed to entryways, keyboards, laptops, and mobile phones.

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22) Oracle to offer free online storage - Tech News - CNET.com: Oracle will soon launch a new online service that will store and manage data for businesses. An Oracle executive said Tuesday that the database software giant will launch later this year a new service ™ dubbed "Oracle Files Online" – that businesses can use to store their corporate data. The service will be free for some levels of disk storage space, but Oracle is leaving open the possibility that it will charge for larger levels of storage. The new Internet service will become the latest Web offering from Oracle, which pumped up its online services, available on Oracle.com, last month with new software for small businesses to manage and automate business activities, such as sales, customer service,

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23) Compaq makes move toward utility-based hardware services: Compaq on Tuesday became the latest major computer vendor to shift its focus from standalone product sales to complete technology solution offerings. The Houston-based company announced a change in its sales strategy, pushing software, hardware, and services packages to large corporate customers in a move to emphasize that it does more than make hardware. Calling the initiative "Computing on Demand," Compaq will tie installation and technical support services to its hardware sales of PCs, servers, storage, and handheld devices. This means Compaq customers will no longer have to build and scale their corporate IT networks with multiple product purchases.

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24) ITtoolbox Portal for SAP News Headline : SAP Sees sales of CRM grow: Backed by a wealth of ERP system installations worldwide, SAP now finds itself carving a sizable niche for its brand of CRM software in Greater China. SAP officials said the company's first batch of CRM projects in the mainland and Hong Kong leveraged its ERP installations. Klaus Zimmer, president of SAP Greater China, said: "What we are helping companies achieve with our combination of business automation tools is to lay the groundwork for collaborative business. SAP is taking advantage of the upswing in CRM spending. The ERP giant reports sales of mySAP CRM jumping 50% since January this year to bring the number of customers to more than 850 worldwide.

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25) CNET.com - News - Investor - News - Story: SAP AG is expected to confirm its position among a dwindling number of reliable performers in the European technology sector next week with a sharp rise in second quarter results, analysts said.

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26) On Trial : Are Tech Companies Destroying Morale? : On "trial": Adobe, Cisco Systems, Hewlett-Packard, Intel, Lucent Technologies, and Sun Microsystems. The charges: Ruining internal morale with pay cuts, early retirement schemes, forced vacations and corporate doublespeak; reducing strategic flexibility by hanging on to too many workers or firing the best. The prosecution: Ladies and gentlemen of the jury, this is a case about pain. Scared of the financial, emotional, and legal pain of firing workers now and having to hire and train more of them when the economy picks up again, technology firms are doing whatever it takes to keep people on the payroll. For more on this case, check out the article...

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27) German union: Shun HP pay-cut plan - Tech News - CNET.com: A German union is encouraging Hewlett-Packard employees not to go along with a voluntary cost-cutting plan that asks them to take a pay cut or forfeit vacation days. HP announced a program in June under which workers could take a 10 percent pay cut through the end of October, take eight days of vacation, or take a 5 percent cut and four days of vacation. But the program was optional: Employees could chose anonymously to keep their full pay and vacation benefits without any repercussions, said spokeswoman Suzette Stephens.

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28) vnunet.com Dairy Crest cuts SAP out of its food chain: "SAP was at different stages of its implementation at Unigate, and some functions had not yet been installed. But Dairy Crest had fully implemented System 21 and Prism, and we didn't want to create complex interfaces to SAP," said Batts.

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29) SAP Evicts Cybersquatter: Invoking its trade dispute resolution power, the World Intellectual Property Rights Organization (WIPO) has ordered India-based cybersquatter Devinder Pal Singh Bhatia to transfer the domain names Sapmaster.com and Sapwizard.com to the German multinational e-business concern, SAP AG.

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30) ROI Versus Strategy: It’s no secret that the economic downturn has led companies to scale back e-business rollouts and focus on those that provide a quick return on investment. But does the new emphasis on targeted implementations come at the expense of a company’s larger strategic goals? And has the reshaped landscape changed the horizon for B2B plans already in place? "The shift is show me the money," says Cap Gemini, Ernst and Young B2B strategy lead Rick Andrade. That means focusing on the short term, bringing strategy, thinking and money forward to produce something that Wall Street and your constituency is happy with.

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31) 2001 Job Satisfaction Survey: Desperate for Direction: It's been a challenging year. The dot-com kingdom collapsed under its own weight, and the economy took a turn for the worse. Layoffs and closings were the order of the day at many companies. But even amid all the turmoil, IT professionals have remained overwhelmingly positive about job security, access to new technologies and their salaries, according to the results of Computerworld's 2001 Annual Job Satisfaction Survey. First, the good news. The majority of this year's 779 respondents said they're generally satisfied with their jobs.

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32) BW Online | July 9, 2001 | Innovation Drought: From one entrepreneurial hotbed to the next are coming tales of technological promise unfulfilled. From networking and e-commerce to software and computer services, the startups that have been fueling innovation around the globe are being snuffed out. Certainly, many of the new companies going belly-up deserve their fate. Did we really need the perpetually whiney Suck.com? Or CD-World, the umpteenth site selling music online? Still, the tech wreck is wreaking havoc on more than just silly ideas. What's getting thrown out these days is the baby, the bathwater, and the basin too. "A couple years ago, even the bad ideas were getting capital," says Bill Joy, chief scientist at Sun Microsystems Inc. "Now, we have gone too far in the other direction, shutting down investment in good ideas."

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