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Bhaja Govindam
The background of Bhaja GovindaM is worth examining. During Shankara's stay in Kashi, he noticed a very old man engaged in the early hours studying the rules of sanskrit by Panini. Shankara was touched with pity seeing the plight of the old man spending his years at a mere intellectual accomplishment while he would be better off praying and spending time to control his mind. Shankara understood that the majority of the world was also engaged in mere intellectual, sense pleasures and not in the divine contemplation. Seeing this, he burst forth with the verses of Bhaja govindaM.
Gurudeva
is a Tamil spelling of the Sanskrit Subhramunya (not be be confused with
practice, called Prayopavesa in Sanskrit scripture, to abstain from
is a Tamil spelling of the Sanskrit Subhramunya (not be be confused with
death, a practice called prayopavesa in Sanskrit. He explained this
Mantras
[What Is a Mantra and How Does It Work|http://www.sanskritmantra.com/what.htm]
Pongal
The Sanskrit term "Shankramana" means "to begin to move". The day on which the sun begins to move northwards is called Makara Shankranti. It usually falls in the middle of January.
The Sanskrit term "Shankramana" means "to begin to move". The day on which the sun begins to move northwards is called Makara Shankranti. It usually falls in the middle of January.
Gokulashtami
Temples are decorated for the occasion. Kirtans are sung, bells are rung, the conch is blown, and Sanskrit hymns are recited in praise of Lord Krishna. At Mathura, the birthplace of Lord Krishna, special spiritual gatherings are organised at this time. Pilgrims from all over India attend these festive gatherings.
ShreeRamanavami
2. Devotees read the whole of the Ramayana, either the Sanskrit version of Sage Valmiki or the Hindi version of Saint Tulsidas, during these nine days.
Links20020105
* [Sanskrit Documents List|http://sanskrit.gde.to/]
Namaste
The sanskrit word Namaste means 'I bow to the divine in you.'
The Hand That Rocks The Cradle Rules the World
Anbe Sivamayam Satyame Parasivam! Tonight we are going to talk about a vast subject, one that is important to every Hindu family: stri dharma, the dharma of the Hindu wife and mother. In Sanskrit stri means "woman." Dharma is a rich word which encompasses many meanings: the path to God Siva, piety, goodness, duty, obligation and more. Stri dharma is the woman's natural path, while purusha dharma, we can say, is the man's.
Yoga
The word 'Yoga' comes from the Sanskrit root 'Yuj' which means 'to
Merlion
When Prince Nila Utama landed on the island, he saw a strange beast. He later learnt that it was a lion and immediately named the island "Singapura", a Sanskrit word for Lion (Singa) and City (Pura).
Sanskrit
[Interests] > Sanskrit ( http://sanskrit.gde.to/ )
[Learn Sanskrit through self study|http://acharya.iitm.ac.in/sanskrit/tutor.html]
[Why Study Sanskrit?|http://acharya.iitm.ac.in/sanskrit/why_sans.php]
[Sanskrit Pronunciation Guide|http://www.kriya.org/magazine/sanskrit.htm] : The Sanskrit language numbers 50 letters: 15 vowels, 25 consonants, 4 semi-vowels, 3 sibilants, 1 aspirate, and 2 compounds.
[Christmas Then and Christmas Now|http://www.blavatsky.net/blavatsky/arts/ChristmasThenAndChristmasNow.htm] : ...as neither the modern Hindu devotee understands a word of the Sanskrit, nor the modern Parsi one syllable of the Zend, so for the average Roman Catholic the Latin is no better than Hieroglyphics. The result is that all the three--Brahmanical High Priest, Zoroastrian Mobed, and Roman Catholic Pontiff, are allowed unlimited opportunities for evolving new religious dogmas out of the depths of their own fancy, for the benefit of their respective churches...
1. Forty-Five Years On, Sanskrit Dictionary Still a Dream
PUNE, INDIA, June 24, 2002: The ambitious Sanskrit dictionary project -
monumental project, titled "Deccan College Sanskrit Dictionary" started in
Sanskrit alphabet which has got at least 44 functional characters. According
disciplines in Sanskrit (Chaturshasthi Kalas) covering a period between Rig
particular word. "Sanskrit is full of compounds and there is no room for
dictionary was printed in 1928. At least the Sanskritists have one advantage
Guru
Guru - [Sanskrit] word
Rudram
[Rudram - Word-by-Word Meaning|http://www.pradosham.com/rudhram.php] : "Sri Rudram is one of the most sacred and powerful mantra found in Krishna Yajurveda. Those who wants to go through the meaning, may please read Sanskrit phrases and English transliteration here."
Amalaki
Amalaki, literally meaning " the sustainer ", is also highly regarded in India that every spring there is a special day on which the tree is worshipped as being divine. It is easy to see that this holiday is motivated by sheer gratitude for a fruit the has nursed an entire society throughout the year. In fact, another of its Sanskrit names is Dhatri, " the nurse of humankind ". Amalaki has been used continuously in Ayurveda for millenia, and according the Vedas, the ancient books of wisdom, it was the first tree in the Universe.
Mantra
Stated simply, a mantra is a sound vibration. The word "mantra" is a Sanskrit word consisting of two syllables: "man" (mind) and "tra" (deliverance). In the strictest sense, a mantra is a pure sound vibration which delivers the mind from its material inclinations and illusion.
Index200301
[Sanskrit]
Ekambara Sastrigal
do)along with Sanskrit scholars and family members. He returned on 13/04/2003
Gita Govinda
http://www.invismultimedia.com/INVISNEW/Pages/Ashtapadi.html : ...Jayadeva's Gita Govindam, also known as Ashtapadi, is a rime of eternal love and supreme devotion composed in the 12th century in India. Poet Jayadeva, born in Orissa was a member of the Court of the King of Bengal. Peerless in the sheer magic of its poetics and passion, Gitagovindam is an unsurpassable gem in Sanskrit poetry...
http://sanskrit.gde.to/doc_trial/gauDIyagranthamandIra/GITAGO-B.TXT
Hatha Yoga Pradipika
[The Hatha Yoga Pradipika|http://www.yogavidya.com/hyp.html] by Svatmarama, [Brian Dana Akers|http://www.briandanaakers.com/] (Translator) : "The classic manual on Hatha Yoga. Contains the original Sanskrit, a new English translation, and photographs of all the asanas."
Lakshmi Thathachar
M A Lakshmi Thathachar is formally a professor of Sanskrit and visually an orthodox brahmin. But study the man's work for the last 25 years and you will discover a man who reaches into Sanskrit texts to practice his farming, conservation, animal husbandry and even research into computer languages. At 68, he awaits young men to join him in creating new departures in computer science. Read a fascinating profile here:
[Soil and soul reconnect with Sanskrit at Melkote|http://www.goodnewsindia.com/Pages/content/traditions/melkote.html]
adhikara
[David Frawley] : [Enlightenment, Are You Prepared ?|http://www.vedanet.com/YogaArticle.htm] : ...The Sanskrit term for competence is adhikara, "the ability or authorization to do."...The problem is we don't like to hear the word “purification” these days. We would prefer to be "natural," which often means avoiding challenging our conditioning and remaining our same old undeveloped selves. This is like the unbaked Soma vessel refusing to be baked but asking for the soma anyway...
Mandala
[Etc] > Mandala is a [Sanskrit] word meaning "circle" representing symbols of the universe and its energy
Chidbhavananda Ashram
The Swami Chidbhavananda Ashram in Theni is run by the Vedanta Sasthra Prachara Trust, founded by [Swami Omkarananda],is primarily a residential institution for teaching scriptures, on a non-commercial basis to youngsters through comprehensive 3-4 year courses. The medium of education shall be Tamil and Sanskrit.
Puthucode
Most of the inhabitants in the immediate surroundings of the temple are Brahmins, who live in four Agraharams radiating at right angles from the temple. They were mostly Vedic and Sanskrit scholars. Many families were proficient in other fine arts like Carnatic music, and music instruments. This was the situation in the olden days. A few among them went out and acquired modern education becoming teachers, lawyers and judges. Some took up Government jobs. After this, under the onslaught of the changed times, steady migration of old inhabitants to other parts looking for new avenues of life took place. To day very few descendants of the old inhabitants live in the village.
20050114
within these gardens, Sanskrit pundits meet every day with youthful
Anuradha Choudry
A highly motivated Sanskrit scholar dedicated to understanding the deeper sense of the Vedas and to promoting Sanskrit as a living, modern, spoken language. Thereby seeking to create awareness about Bharat’s rich culture and to help restore a sense of pride about her invaluable heritage.
Anuradha, a former student of the Sri Aurobindo International Centre of Education, Pondicherry, has been closely associated with Sanskrit for the past 20 years. After graduating from the Ashram School in 1998, she pursued her passion for Sanskrit through her Masters and her M.Phil degrees. During her Post Graduation, she joined a voluntary organization called [Samskrita Bharati], a world-wide movement dedicated to promoting Sanskrit as a living language, and was trained in a special methodology of Teaching called “Edutainment”, a combination of Education and Entertainment.
· UGC (University Grants Commission, Govt. Of India) as Instructor for teaching Spoken Sanskrit in the Pondicherry University.
· Rashtriya Sanskrit Sansthan, a Deemed University, Delhi, as teacher, for 3 month Courses, open to interested candidates from various backgrounds.
· Samskrita Bharati, as a teacher for several 10 day Spoken Sanskrit Courses in India, including IIT, Kharagpur (a leading Technical Institute); as a teacher for training candidates to conduct Spoken Sanskrit Workshops.
Furthermore, she has enriched herself by participating in National and International Conferences on Sanskrit and psychology.
Currently doing her Ph.D to understand the deeper psycho-spiritual content of the Veda with special reference to Sri Aurobindo, she is also a Sanskrit teacher in Auroville, an international township.
When asked about her hobbies, she cannot resist mentioning, “speaking and making others speak Sanskrit!” besides, dancing (Kathak & Folk Dances), acting, painting, travelling, understanding other cultures, playing football and camping.
Rutger Kortenhorst
[People] > Rutger Kortenhorst is a Sanskrit teacher in John Scottus school in Dublin.
Good evening Ladies and Gentlemen, we are going to spend an hour together looking at the topic ‘Why does my child do Sanskrit in John Scottus?’ My bet is that at the end of the hour you will all have come to the conclusion that your children are indeed fortunate that this extraordinary subject is part of their curriculum.
Firstly, let us look at Why Sanskrit for my child? We are the only school in Ireland doing this language, so this will need some explaining. There are another 8 JSS-type schools around the world that have made the same decision to include Sanskrit in their curriculum (they are all off-shoots from the School of Philosophy).
Secondly, how is Sanskrit taught? You may have noticed your son or daughter singing Sanskrit grammar songs in the back of the car just for the fun of it on the way home from school. I’ll spend some time telling you HOW we approach teaching Sanskrit now since my year in India.
But first of all: WHY Sanskrit? To answer that we need to look at the qualities of Sanskrit. Sanskrit stands out above all other languages for its beauty of sound, precision in pronunciation and reliability as well as thoroughness in every aspect of its structure. This is why it has never fundamentally changed unlike all other languages. It has had no need to change being the most perfect language of Mankind.
If we consider Shakespeare’s English, we realize how different and therefore difficult for us his English language was although it is just English from less than 500 years ago. We struggle with the meaning of Shakespeare’s English or that of the King James Bible. Go back a bit further and we don’t have a clue about the English from the time of Chaucer’s ‘Pilgrim’s Progress’ from around 700 AD. We cannot even call this English anymore and now rightly call it Anglo-Saxon. So English hadn’t even been born! All languages keep changing beyond recognition. They change because they are defective. The changes are in fact corruptions. They are born and die after seven or eight hundred years –about the lifetime of a Giant Redwood Tree- because after so much corruption they have no life left in them. Surprisingly there is one language in the world that does not have this short lifespan. Sanskrit is the only exception. It is a never-dying constant. The reason for the constancy in Sanskrit is that it is completely structured and thought out. There is not a word that has been left out in its grammar or etymology, which means every word can be traced back to where it came from originally. This does not mean there is no room for new words either. Just as in English we use older concepts from Greek and Latin to express modern inventions like a television: ‘tele [far] – vision [seeing]’ or ‘compute –er’. Sanskrit in fact specializes in making up compound words from smaller words and parts. The word ‘Sams - krita’ itself means ‘completely – made’.
So what advantages are there to a fundamentally unchanging language? What is advantageous about an unchanging friend, say? Are they reliable? What happens if you look at a text in Sanskrit from thousands of years ago?
The exceptional features of Sanskrit have been recognised for a few centuries all over the world, so you will find universities from many countries having a Sanskrit faculty. Whether you go to Hawai, Cambridge or Harvard and even Trinity College Dublin has a seat for Sanskrit –although it is vacant at present. May be one of your children will in time fill this position again?
Although India has been its custodian, Sanskrit has had universal appeal for centuries. The wisdom carried by this language appeals to the West as we can see from Yoga and Ayurvedic Medicine as well as meditation techniques, and practical philosophies like Buddhism and most of what we use in the School of Philosophy. It supports, expands and enlightens rather than conflicts withlocal traditions and religions.
The precision of Sanskrit stems from the unparalleled detail on how the actual sounds of the alphabet are structured and defined. The sounds have a particular place in the mouth, nose and throat that can be defined and will never change. This is why in Sanskrit the letters are called the ‘Indestructibles’ [aksharáni]. Sanskrit is the only language that has consciously laid out its sounds from first principles. So the five mouth-positions for all Indestructibles [letters] are defined and with a few clearly described mental and physical efforts all are systematically planned: [point out chart]
Then there is the sheer beauty of the Sanskrit script as we learn it today. [Some examples on the board]
You may well say: ‘Fine, but so why should my son or daughter have yet another subject and another script to learn in their already busy school-day?’ In what way will he or she benefit from the study of Sanskrit in 2010 in the Western world?
The qualities of Sanskrit will become the qualities of your child- that is the mind and heart of your child will become beautiful, precise and reliable.
Sanskrit automatically teaches your child and anybody else studying it to pay FINE attention due to its uncanny precision. When the precision is there the experience is, that it feels uplifting. It makes you happy. It is not difficult even for a beginner to experience this. All you have to do is fine-tune your attention and like music you are drawn in and uplifted. This precision of attention serves all subjects, areas and activities of life both while in school and for the rest of life. This will give your child a competitive advantage over any other children. They will be able to attend more fully, easily and naturally. Thus in terms of relationships, work, sport– in fact all aspects of life, they will perform better and gain more satisfaction. Whatever you attend to fully, you excel in and you enjoy more.
By studying Sanskrit, other languages can be learnt more easily; this being the language all others borrow from fractionally. The Sanskrit grammar is reflected in part in Irish or Greek, Latin or English. They all have a part of the complete Sanskrit grammar. Some being more developed than others, but always only a part of the Sanskrit grammar, which is complete in itself.
What Sanskrit teaches us that there is a language that is ordered, following laws unfailingly and as they are applied your child gets uplifted, not only when they grow up, but as they are saying it! This means they get an unusual but precise, definite and clear insight into language while they are enjoying themselves.
They learn to speak well, starting from Sanskrit, the mother language of all languages. Those who speak well run the world. Barack Obama makes a difference because he can speak well. Mahatma Gandhi could move huge crowds with well-balanced words. Mother Theresa could express herself with simple words which uplift us even now. The language of the great Master Teachers of mankind from times past is all we have got after centuries and millennia, but they make all the difference. We can enter the remarkable mind of Plato through his words. If your daughter or son can express themselves well through conscious language they will be the leaders of the next generation.
Sanskrit has the most comprehensive writings in the world expressed through the Vedas and the Gítá. The Upanishads –translated by William Butler Yeats have given people from all over the world an insight into universal religious feelings for more than one century now. To know these well expressed simple words of wisdom in the original is better than dealing with copies or translations as copies are always inferior to originals. We really need clear knowledge on universal religion in an age faced with remarkable levels of religious bigotry and terrorism arising from poorly understood and half-baked religious ideas.
Sanskrit can help your child to express universal, harmonious and simple truths better. As a result you will really have done your duty as a parent and the world will reap the benefits in a more humane, harmonious and united society. Sanskrit can do this as it is the only language that is based in knowledge all the way. Nothing is left to chance.
I have seen myself and others growing in such qualities, because of our contact with Sanskrit. I have just spent a year in India. Though it felt a bit like camping in a tent for a year, it was well worth it. For many years, we taught Sanskrit like zealots i.e. with high levels of enthusiasm and low levels of understanding, to both adults in the School of Philosophy and children in John Scottus School. We did not perhaps inspire a lot of our students and may have put a number of them off the study of Sanskrit. It felt to me like we needed to go to the source. Sanskrit teachers worth their salt need to live with people whose daily means of communication is in Sanskrit. I had already spent three summers near Bangalore doing just that and becoming less of an amateur, but it really needed a more thorough study. So I moved into a traditional gurukulam for the year. This meant living on campus, eating lots of rice and putting up with a few power-cuts and water shortages, but by December 2009, I made up my mind that I would step down as vice-principal of the Senior School and dedicate myself to Sanskrit for the rest of my teaching life. It felt like a promotion to me as quite a few could be vice-principal but right now which other teacher could forge ahead in Sanskrit in Ireland? [Hopefully this will change before I pop off to the next world.] With Sanskrit I’m expecting my mind to improve with age even if my body slows down a little. Sanskrit is often compared to the full-time teacher, who is there for you 24/7 whereas the other languages are more like part-timers. The effects of studying Sanskrit on me have been first and foremost a realistic confidence. Secondly, it meant I had to become more precise and speak weighing my words more carefully. It also taught me to express myself with less waffle and therefore speak more briefly. My power of attention and retention has undoubtedly increased.
Now, let me explain for a few minutes, HOW Sanskrit is taught. To my surprise it is not taught well in most places in India. Pupils have to learn it from when they are around age 9 to 11 and then they give it up, because it is taught so badly! Only a few die-hards stick with it, in time teaching the same old endings endlessly to the next generation. This is partly due to India having adopted a craving to copy the West and their tradition having been systematically rooted out by colonialism.
For learning grammar and the wisdom of the East, I was well-placed in a traditional gurukulam, but for spoken Sanskrit I felt a modern approach was missing.
Then I found a teacher from the International School belonging to the Sri Aurobindo Ashram in Pondicherry. His name is Narendra. He has developed a novel, inspiring and light method to teach grammar, which doesn’t feel like you do any grammar at all. At the same time it isn’t diluted for beginners so you don’t end up with partial knowledge. I also foolowed a few Sanskrit Conversation camps, which all brought about more familiarity.
This is how I would summarize the principles for teaching Sanskrit as we carry it out at present:
1. Language learning is not for academics as everyone learns to speak a language from an early age before they can read and write and know what an academic is. So why insist in teaching Sanskrit academically?
4. Understanding works better than memorisation in this Age. Learning by heart should only take up 10 % of the mental work, rather than the 90 % rote learning in Sanskrit up to the recent present.
8. The course should be finished in two years by an average student according to Narendra. This may be a little optimistic given that we are a little out of the loop not living in India, which is still Sanskrit’s custodian. At present I would say it is going to be a three-year course.
We have started on this course since September and it has certainly put a smile on our pupils’ faces, which makes a pleasant change. I now feel totally confident that we are providing your children with a thorough, structured and enjoyable course. Our students should be well prepared for the International Sanskrit Cambridge exam by the time they finish –age 14/15- at the end of second year. We will also teach them some of the timeless wisdom enshrined in various verses. At present we are teaching them:
Language has to become more universal now as we can connect with each other globally within seconds. NASA America’s Space Program is actively looking at Sanskrit in relation to I.T. and artificial intelligence.
What Sanskrit enthusiasts have said:
Sanskrit and computers are a perfect fit. The precision play of Sanskrit with computer tools will awaken the capacity in human beings to utilize their innate higher mental faculty with a momentum that would inevitably transform the mind. In fact, the mere learning of Sanskrit by large numbers of people in itself represents a quantum leap in consciousness, not to mention the rich endowment it will provide in the arena of future communication. NASA, California
After many thousands of years, Sanskrit still lives with a vitality that can breathe life, restore unity and inspire peace on our tired and troubled planet. It is a sacred gift, an opportunity. The future could be very bright.
You may well have a few questions at this stage after which I would like to introduce you to a plant in the audience. A parent turned into a blazing ball of enthusiasm over Sanskrit grammar: John Doran. I would like him to wrap up.
One thing is certain; Sanskrit will only become the planetary language when it is taught in a way which is exiting and enjoyable. Furthermore it must address individual learning inhibitions with clarity and compassion in a setting which encourages everyone to step forth, take risks, make mistakes and learn.

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