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Nonviolence and us
American society is, reputedly, build on rugged individualism, which was fine when pioneers came to conquer the land.  But once settled, a society cannot thrive on such individualism.  A nation is as cohesive as its society and the society is as cohesive as the family.  If every member of a family thought only about himself or herself, the "family" would be more like a collection of people grappling for material survival under the same roof.  There would be no love, no cooperation.  When understanding wears thin, relationships begin to fray, and before we know it the fabric we call "family" disintegrates.  The effect of this domestic disaster is reflected today in our workplace and in society.
In our headlong pursuit of the ideal life, people seem to matter the least[list in the source - what is correct?] - sometimes even our own people.  This sets the stage for much of the violence we experience in our daily lives.  Violence, we must understand, is not always physical.  We practice a great deal of passive violence: greed, selfishness, thoughtlessness, prejudice, bigotry, exploitation, suppression, oppression, hate, anger, and so on.  Building a "family tree" of violence, such as the one shown in the Figure, with passive and physical as the two offspring, is a revealing exercise.  This chart should adorn a wall at home so that all family members could participate in researching each act of passive violence committed.  This is an effective way of recognizing our weaknesses and searching for ways to turn them into strengths.
People-2018-07-31
Apart from Friends & Family, following are people I like to be around... people's [weblog]s and websites !
* [Maya Ma|http://www.wisearth.org/] : The goal of our mission is to cultivate health and healing without medicine, to evoke your memory of wellness and love and joy and to awaken in everyone there innate power of healing and a sense of shared responsibility for the well-being of the human family as a whole. Each one of us on this earth travels a unique path, guided by karma and desire.
Health
* [Ten ways to enhance your family dinnertime] - Meera Publications
How to set and Achieve Goals
* Second step-use another sheet of paper, and this time consider yourself and your personal goals for the next 12 month period. Some key areas in which you might set personal goals include: family, personal growth, financial, health, social, career, hobbies, spiritual, and recreation. Write down the things that you plan to accomplish or achieve or attain during this one-year period?
* Set goals with your family also. Help children learn this process early in life.
Onam
As a symbolic gesture to welcome ' King Mahabali' a flower carpet is laid in front of every house. The head of the family distributes new cloths to all the family members and their dependants. A sumptious meal on plantain leaf and the traditional sweet dish of Kerala 'Payasam' etc are served in every house.
The Invitation
([source|http://www.familymanagement.com/spirit/invitation.html])
What is wrong with being in a hurry?
Two men met at a bar and struck up a conversation. After a while one of them said, "You think you have family problems? Listen to my situation. A few years ago I met a young widow with a grown-up daughter and we got married. Later, my father married my stepdaughter. That made my stepdaughter my stepmother, and my father became my stepson. Also, my wife became the mother-in-law of her father-in-law.
"I am my stepmother's brother-in-law; my wife is her own child's aunt, my son is my father's nephew and I am my own grandfather. And you think you have family problems?"
Bhaja Govindam
Bhaja govindaM is one of the minor compositions of the spiritual gaint, Adi SHANKARA. It is classified as a Prakarana grantha, a primer to the major works. Though sung as a bhajan, it contains the essence of vedanta and awakens the man to think, "Why am I here in this life ? Why am I amassing wealth, family, but have no peace ? What is the Truth ? What is the purpose of life ?" Man is thus awakened and gets set on a path to the inner road back to God.
So long as a man is fit and able to support his family, see the affection all those around him show. But no one at home cares to even have a word with him when his body totters due to old age.
When one is alive, his family members enquire kindly about his welfare. But when the soul departs from the body, even his wife runs away in fear of the corpse.
Gurudeva
grew up near Lake Tahoe. He was orphaned by age 11 and raised by a family
systems. No loss of the family wealth for prolonged health care or into the
protect the stone sculptors from the Indian sun. A Malaysian family,
to Bangalore to supervise the workers. The family oversees even today the
Subramuniyaswami advised his family members to use ayurvedic medicine and
Equally, his family devotees are pure, one-minded and deeply committed.
What Makes a House a Home?
worships every morning together as one family is like a temple. That's
talk together, if they eat together, they are a family, even if they are
destitute. Such a family is at home wherever they are. You don't need a
roof to make a family. You don't need a roof to make a home. The truly
the family in their house. Babysitters often abuse their children. Parents
Herbs & Spices
An extremely versatile herb in the mint family, with many types which vary by flavor, color and size. The domestic version, native to India and Iran, has a large leaf with a flavor that greatly enhances tomatoes, pesto and Italian foods of all kinds. Sweet basil has a smaller leaf and has a sweet taste as its name suggests with a more pungent aroma. Sweet basil also works well in Italian foods. Basil also has blends nicely with other herbs and spices such as parsley, rosemary, oregano, thyme, sage and saffron.
A native Indian spice in the ginger family, it has a spicy, sharp and sweet taste with a aroma reminiscent of cinnamon.
First cultivated in Mexico and South America 9,000 years ago, chile peppers are members of the Solanaceae plant family, to which tomatoes, potatoes and eggplants belong. All chile peppers fall into genus Capsicum, which includes 20-30 different species. The plant pods are really berries, but are referred to as fruits by horticulturists. When harvested green, pods are considered vegetables, and when harvested red, are referred to as spice. "Heat" comes from Capsaicin, which can be measure in units called Scoville units. For more information on specific chilies, please see (add link to another page/section? on chile).
An herb in the onion family, but with a milder, more delicate flavor. It is rich in vitamins A and C and tastes great with eggs, salads, baked potatoes, soups and sauces.
A popular herb in the carrot family, its flavor is reminiscent of an orange peel. It is commonly used as a companion to curry and to flavor meat and poultry.
Of central Asian origin, it is the bulb of a plant in the lily family. It comes in many varieties, most commonly as white, pink and purple skinned cloves, the latter considered to be the best. One of the most versatile and useful flavorings, it is widely used spice in many cuisines, most notably Italian and Mexican.
From the cabbage family, mustard seeds come in a variety of flavors and colors. Mustards made from the brown and black seeds have the strongest flavor. White mustard which bears large, yellow seeds is most commonly used in American mustards. Yellow mustard is more spicy than white and is used to accent sauces, meats, stews and dressings. Colmans mustard is even spicier and is used for pickling and in sauces.
A Mediterranean spice in the mint family, it has a sweet taste and herbal fragance. It can be used to flavor a variety of foods including pork, veal, stuffing, sausage and tomato sauces.
From a tree in the laurel family native to North America, it is primarily used is as a filé powder consisting of the dried ground leaves of the tree. It's most common use is as a thickening agent in Cajun or Creole gumbo. It is also used in and with soups, fish, shellfish, poultry, highly spiced meat and in savory dishes requiring a thickening agent.
Another Mediterranean spice in the mint family, it has a strong, slightly peppery flavor and is used to flavor legumes, meat, fish (especially trout), sausage, stuffing and tomato sauces.
An herb in the mint family of Mediterranean origin, it is aromatic with an herbal flavor. It can be used to improve the flavor of most dishes, especially slow cooked dishes.
A spice in the ginger family, it has a warm, mild aroma with a yellow/gold color. It is most often used in East Indian foods such as chutney and as an accent to legumes, vegetables and meats.
Is life really meaningless?
WHEN I WAS A STUDENT, my principal in the high school was continuously troubled by my absence from the school. My family was troubled. I would start going to school, but never reach there. Life was so much, and so many things were happening on the way... and the school was almost one mile away from the house.
The algebra of infinite justice
But who is Osama bin Laden really? Let me rephrase that. What is Osama bin Laden? He's America's family secret. He is the American president's dark doppelgänger. The savage twin of all that purports to be beautiful and civilised. He has been sculpted from the spare rib of a world laid to waste by America's foreign policy: its gunboat diplomacy, its nuclear arsenal, its vulgarly stated policy of "full-spectrum dominance", its chilling disregard for non-American lives, its barbarous military interventions, its support for despotic and dictatorial regimes, its merciless economic agenda that has munched through the economies of poor countries like a cloud of locusts. Its marauding multinationals who are taking over the air we breathe, the ground we stand on, the water we drink, the thoughts we think. Now that the family secret has been spilled, the twins are blurring into one another and gradually becoming interchangeable. Their guns, bombs, money and drugs have been going around in the loop for a while. (The Stinger missiles that will greet US helicopters were supplied by the CIA. The heroin used by America's drug addicts comes from Afghanistan. The Bush administration recently gave Afghanistan a $43m subsidy for a "war on drugs"....)
Understanding the Lessons of September 11
Vasudhaiv Kutumbakam, that "The whole world is one family." In the midst of
one family." We must continue to pray Sarve bhavantu sukhinah, sarve santu
Weblog2001November
[Joel Snyder] ( commenting on an article about Bin Laden's family members leaving the USA : ...This whole article is offensive and the worst sort of journalistic sensationalism...
Relative and Absolute Happiness
My teacher used to talk about two kinds of happiness-©˜ relative and absolute©˜ happiness. Relative happiness is happiness that depends on things outside ourselves: friends, and family, surroundings, the size of our home or family income. This is what we feel when a desire is fulfilled, or something we have longed for is obtained. While the happiness such things bring us is certainly real, the fact is that none of this lasts for ever. Things change. People change. This kind of happiness shatters easily when external conditions alter.
"It is a fact that everyone in the world is seeking happiness, often unconsciously (whatever their concept of it is) - some may deny it, citing other pursuits instead, but no-one actively pursues misery, except in the mistaken belief that it is happiness. That the pursuit of this ideal is often unrecognised by those seeking it, must be accepted by us - it is nevertheless a fact - and happiness is given many names, satisfaction, excitement, thrill, good times etc. Its pursuit can take on the guise of drug and alcohol abuse, sexual pursuit, greed, lust for power, high ambition, steady employment, a family, good exam results etc."
Deepavali
Everyone forgets and forgives the wrongs done by others. There is an air of freedom, festivity and friendliness everywhere. This festival brings about unity. It instils charity in the hearts of people. Everyone buys new clothes for the family. Employers, too, purchase new clothes for their employees.
Steven Vore
"Does he have a family? You betcha. A wonderful wife and two great boys."
Marriage
[Make Your Marriage A Priority And Your Kids Will Benefit|http://www.zenfamilyhabits.net/2009/10/make-your-marriage-a-priority-and-your-kids-will-benefit/]
* [family.org: Husbands & Wives|http://www.family.org/married/]
The Ten Marks of a Happy Marriage
2. LOVING ACCEPTANCE: The most fundamental idea in Christianity is about 'grace' - I am loved before I change. God loves me as I am. He doesn't love anyone else more than he loves me, and nothing I can do can increase his love for me. Our society, on the other hand, teaches us that worth is something you earn. At school those with higher grades are more highly esteemed than 'dunces'. In the army those with fewer stripes take orders from those with more. But in God's family the prodigal is valued as highly as the loyal son. So too in marriage. I love my wife before she changes, or whether she changes or not. Nothing is unforgivable. Nothing will stop me loving her: she can count utterly on that. So a good marriage is the union of two good forgivers: it is 'three parts love and seven parts forgiveness'.
6. CONFLICT RESOLUTION: A survey among 700 marriage counselors found that 'communication breakdown' headed the list of marital problems (followed by loss of shared goals/interests; sexual incompatibility, infidelity, excitement and fun leaving the marriage, money, conflicts about children, alcohol/drug abuse, women's equality issues and the in-laws). Conflict arises because we bring different biographies, needs, interests, values, and lifestyles to our marriage. The trigger for a 'conflictual explosion' may include loss of a job, arrival of a new baby, an illness, moving to a new house, taking an aged parent into the home etc. Marriage breakdowns do not happen because of 'differences'; they happen because a couple can't handle those differences. Relationships do not cause conflict: they bring out whatever incompleteness we have within us anyway. Conflict is a contest of wills, but it ought not to be viewed as a power struggle or as a question of who is right or wrong. Gentle assertiveness is called for: 'speaking the truth in love' and asking about feelings that underlie the difficulty. Discuss with dignity, and sensitivity to the other's needs. 'If pride and prejudice were set aside, most difficulties could be resolved in five minutes.' Resolution may allow one partner or the other to have a 'veto' in certain areas: in our marriage, Jan has veto power in the kitchen, I do with the cars (except for their colour!). But re the issue of my ministry-time away from home, this was resolved in a family conference: I would not be away more than a third of the time; and would forego preaching engagements at least once a month to attend our local church with my wife and family. Some things important to you you'll have to concede - that is, compromise. Jan and I compromise on our leisure: I like competitive sports and swimming but she prefers walking so we walk more than we swim (and we rarely play tennis together!). And don't complain too much: your 'fussing' can be viewed as trivial by the other.
The Wooden Bowl
A frail old man went to live with his son, daughter-in-law, and four-year grandson. The old man's hands trembled, his eyesight was blurred, and his step faltered. The family ate together at the table. But the elderly grandfather's shaky hands and failing sight made eating difficult. Peas rolled off his spoon onto the floor. When he grasped the glass, milk spilled on the tablecloth. The son and daughter-in-law became irritated with the mess.
"We must do something about Grandfather," said the son. "I've had enough of his spilled milk, noisy eating, and food on the floor." So the husband and wife set a small table in the corner. There, Grandfather ate alone while the rest of the family enjoyed dinner. Since Grandfather had broken a dish or two his food was served in a wooden bowl. When the family glanced in Grandfather's direction, sometimes he had a tear in his eye as he sat alone. Still, the only words the couple had for him were sharp admonitions when he dropped a fork or spilled food.
The words so struck the parents that they were speechless. Then tears started to stream down their cheeks. Though no word was spoken, both knew what must be done. That evening the husband took Grandfather's hand and gently led him back to the family table.
For the remainder of his days he ate every meal with the family. And for some reason, neither husband nor wife seemed to care any longer when a fork was dropped, milk spilled, or the tablecloth soiled.
Children are remarkably perceptive. Their eyes ever observe, their ears ever listen, and their minds ever process the messages they absorb. If they see us patiently provide a happy home atmosphere for family members, they will imitate that attitude for the rest of their lives.
I've learned that if you pursue happiness, it will elude you. But, if you focus on your family, your friends, the needs of others, your work and doing the very best you can, happiness will find you.
Weblog2001December
Apart from family and friends, I would like to thank the following people for sharing their thoughts/life and making available usable/useful/enjoyable tools on the web.
(via [PaperQuote]) [Buddha] : A family is a place where minds come in contact with one another. If these minds love one another the home will be as beautiful as a flower garden.
Hardware
[ThumbDrive 2 Smart|http://www.trekstorusa.com/thumbdrive_2smart.htm] : .....The ThumbDrive 2 Smart takes the ThumbDrive product family to the next level. Whether you use the ThumbDrive to transport data from one computer to another, or to backup and archive data, the ThumbDrive 2 Smart with USB 2.0 High Speed technology does the job well, and FAST!.....
Pongal
There is family re-union in all homes. Brothers renew their contacts with their married sisters by giving them presents.
Both these days, which are family re-union days, are regarded as being inauspicious for travel. This is to prevent us from going away from home on those days.
Pancha Ganapati
focused upon by the entire family. Because of the festival's importance
be within the means of each family. Handmade presents are by far the
December 21, yellow: The family sadhana for the first day of Pancha
family members. The day begins early, and the entire family works together
family sits together for the purpose of easing any strained relationships
are then exchanged and placed unopened before Pancha Ganapati. As family
Family, relatives and friends gather for satsang to share and enjoy
December 25, orange: The family sadhana for the final day is to bring
performed during the first four days, the family is now more open and
this day the entire family experiences an outpouring of love and
Manish Vaidya
Manish Vaidya is a "dream chaser" who lives and works in the Silicon valley. When not riding the valley-life roller coaster, he enjoys traveling, taking pictures, listening to Hindi film music and most of all, spending fun times with family and friends. Also, dabbles in creative writing - governed mostly by the duration of the laptop battery on a long-haul flight.
Weblog2002January
[Craig Jensen] [:|http://booknotes.weblogs.com/2001/12/22] "With the tumultous state the world is in I feel uncomfortable, even guilty, being in any kind of festive or celebratory mood. And, in fact, I'm not festive. Nor am I filled with hope from any kind of religious faith. I'm mostly depressed. - - - But I realize that the sphere within which I have the most influence is my family. The most important people to me are my wife, son and daughter and then my extended family. Mothers, fathers, sisters, brothers, nieces, nephews. All the quirks and dysfunctionalty set aside, this is the circle where I can find unbounded love and acceptance. It is the place where I can return that love, equally unbounded, without fear of reprisal or rejection. I am lucky. Truly so. I intend to immerse myself in my good fortune. In my own little circle I will enjoy peace and love and joy. - - - My hope and wish is that you will find yourselves enjoying the same. Be safe and well."
Happiness
It is a fact that everyone in the world is seeking happiness, often unconsciously (whatever their concept of it is) - some may deny it, citing other pursuits instead, but no-one actively pursues misery, except in the mistaken belief that it is happiness. That the pursuit of this ideal is often unrecognised by those seeking it, must be accepted by us - it is nevertheless a fact - and happiness is given many names, satisfaction, excitement, thrill, good times etc. Its pursuit can take on the guise of drug and alcohol abuse, sexual pursuit, greed, lust for power, high ambition, steady employment, a family, good exam results etc. The list is in fact endless, but none of them lead to real abiding happiness, because no sooner is one objective fulfilled than another raises its head to spoil the fragment of happiness obtained. So what is the solution and how do we find this real and abiding happiness ? The clues are there for everyone to see, both in the world and within yourself, but most people miss them.
Henry James Gallagher
2001 Jan 01 : 1430 CET : Master Gallagher is born at [Krankehaus Salem|http://www.salem-krankenhaus.de/] ( currently at room 404 ). He looks cute :-) >>> [first pictures|http://gallagher.150m.com/family/babypics.html]
Pearls
([source|http://radio.weblogs.com/0101915/2002/01/21.html#a8]) ...Perhaps the reason we in America feel less impacted by the suffering of folks in other countries is the same reason we are heartbroken by deaths in our own family but barely acknowledge the passing away of the old man down the street -- regardless of the fact that old man may have a loving family that is devastated by the loss. It only hurts when it is your own hand that is cut off. The preciousness of life is universal. Unfortunately, so is the callousness of man. - - - - - The God I know has no nationality...
"With the tumultous state the world is in I feel uncomfortable, even guilty, being in any kind of festive or celebratory mood. And, in fact, I'm not festive. Nor am I filled with hope from any kind of religious faith. I'm mostly depressed. - - - But I realize that the sphere within which I have the most influence is my family. The most important people to me are my wife, son and daughter and then my extended family. Mothers, fathers, sisters, brothers, nieces, nephews. All the quirks and dysfunctionalty set aside, this is the circle where I can find unbounded love and acceptance. It is the place where I can return that love, equally unbounded, without fear of reprisal or rejection. I am lucky. Truly so. I intend to immerse myself in my good fortune. In my own little circle I will enjoy peace and love and joy. - - - My hope and wish is that you will find yourselves enjoying the same. Be safe and well."
Wendell Berry
In 1963, he taught at New York University. When Berry was offered and accepted a teaching position in the English Department at the University of Kentucky, the Berry's came home to Henry County in Kentucky. He lives on a 125 acre farm where his family has lived since the early 1800's. According to Bryan Wooley, "Berry is the fifth generation of his father's family and the sixth of his mother's to farm in Henry County, in the neighborhood of Port Royal" (8). Although his wife, formerly Tanya Amyx, lived in the city all her life, she and her husband raised their two children, Mary Dee and Pryor (Den) Clifford, on the farm. In the article "Wendell Berry, A Kentucky Writer Tries to Strengthen the Ties Between Man and the Land," Wooley discusses Berry's farm life. Berry did not initially intend to live on this farm but intended to use it as a vacation place. Instead the Berry's renovated the house and moved in around July 4, 1965. "It is a real farm, not a writer-professor's country estate. Its chores include milking cows and currying horses, and mucking out stalls and mending fences and mowing hay and all other time-consuming sometimes back-breaking, labor that family agriculture requires" (10).
The Hand That Rocks The Cradle Rules the World
An Inspired Talk delivered by [Gurudeva] Satguru Sivaya Subramuniyaswami on his 54th Jayanti, on January 5, 1980, at the Kadavul Hindu Temple in Hawaii, enjoining the modern Hindu woman to not forsake her dharma but protect the home and nurture the family as her gift of love to the next generation. Hmmm! It seems not to have gone out of date much.
Anbe Sivamayam Satyame Parasivam! Tonight we are going to talk about a vast subject, one that is important to every Hindu family: stri dharma, the dharma of the Hindu wife and mother. In Sanskrit stri means "woman." Dharma is a rich word which encompasses many meanings: the path to God Siva, piety, goodness, duty, obligation and more. Stri dharma is the woman's natural path, while purusha dharma, we can say, is the man's.
Don't forget that in the East the ties of the extended family are very close. Women live in a community, surrounded by younger and older women, often living in the same house. They enjoy a rewarding life which includes helping the younger ones and being helped by those who are more mature. Several generations work together in sharing the joys as well as the burdens of household culture. It is different in the West. Women here usually do not have the advantages of close association with other family members. Naturally, they become a little lonely, especially if they do not have a religious community of friends. They get lonely and want to get out in the world and enjoy life a little. This is another reason women leave the home. It is very unfortunate.
In the East there is a better balance of the masculine and feminine forces. In the West the masculine is too strong, too dominant. The feminine energies need to be allowed greater expression. But that does not mean women should start doing what men do. No. That only confuses the forces more. A better balance must be found. In the East the woman is protected. She is like a precious gem. You don't leave it unattended. You protect it. You guard it well because you don't wish to lose it. Hindu women are guarded well. They are not allowed to become worldly. They are not exposed to the looks and thoughts of a base public, nor must they surrender their modesty to contend with business affairs. She can be perfectly feminine, expressing her natural qualities of gentleness, intuitiveness, love and modesty. The home and family are the entire focus of a Hindu woman's life.
Many of you here tonight are too young to know that this was also the pattern in the West until about seventy-five years ago. Before World War I, women were very strict in the West. It was that war and the one that followed that broke down the ancient roles of men and women. The men were taken away from industry by the army, and women were forced out of the home into the factories and businesses so that production could continue. Earlier they had been protected, seldom seen unaccompanied in public. Throughout history, women had been the caretakers of the home and the defenders of virtue. They valued their purity, their chastity, and were virgins when they married. Many people don't know that the old values were followed most strictly up until 1915 or so. Then the two world wars broke up the family and disturbed the balance between men and women. For the first time, women were seen alone in public. For the first time, they left the home and competed with men for their jobs.
I speak often of the change humanity is going through in moving out of the agricultural era and into the technological age. This change has affected the dharma of the woman and the dharma of the man in an interesting way. During the tens of thousands of years of the agricultural age, families lived and labored mostly on farms or in craft guilds. The entire family worked on the farm. The men all worked in the fields; the women and children worked in the home. Children were a great asset. More children meant more help, a bigger farm. There were many chores that a young boy or girl could do. When harvest time came, everyone joined in. It was a one team, and everyone contributed. When the crop was sold, that was the income for a combined effort from all members--men, women and even children. In a very real sense, everyone was earning the money, everyone was economically important.
In the technological era, only the man of the house earns the family income. Everyone else spends it. The husband goes to work in a factory or large company office while his wife and children stay at home. There is not much they can do to help him during the day with his work. His work and his wife's are not as closely related as in the old days. He is the provider, the producer now; she and the children are consumers. Because the children cannot help much, they have become more of an economic liability than an asset. This, coupled with the population problems on the Earth, devalues the economic importance of the woman's traditional role as wife and mother. Whereas raising children and taking care of the farmhouse used to be a woman's direct and vital contribution toward the family's livelihood and even the survival of the human race, today it is not. Whereas they used to be partners in a family farm business, today he does all the earning and she feels like a dependent. The answer is not to have women join their men in the factories and corporations. The answer is to bring traditional religious values into the technological era, to find a new balance of karma that allows for the fulfillment of both the man's and the woman's dharma.
Let me tell you a sad story. We have a book in our library which describes a plan, made by the Christians, to destroy Hinduism in Sri Lanka and India. One of their major tactics is to get the Hindu women out of the homes and working in the world. They knew that the spiritual force within the home is created by the unworldly woman. They knew that a secure woman makes for a secure home and family, a secure husband and a secure religion. They knew that the Hindu woman is the key to the perpetuation of Hinduism as long as she is in the home. If the woman is in the home, if she is happy and content and the children are nurtured and raised properly, then the astral beings around the home will be devonic, friendly and beneficial. But if she is out of the home and the husband is out of the home, the protective force-field around the home disintegrates, allowing all kinds of astral asuric beings to enter. Such a neglected home becomes inhabited by base, asuric beings on the lower astral plane. You cannot see these beings, but they are there, and you can sense their presence. Things just don't feel right in a home inhabited by negative forces. You have the desire to leave such a home as soon as you enter it. The children absorb these vibrations, these feelings. Children are open and psychically sensitive to such influences, with little means of self-protection. They will become disturbed, and no one will know the reason why. They will be crying and even screaming. They will be constantly disobedient. Why should they become disobedient? There is no positive, protective force field of religion established by the mother. This leaves the inner force field vulnerable to negative and confusing forces of all kinds, especially in modern, overpopulated cities where destructive psychic influences are so strong. These negative vibrations are penetrating the inner atmosphere of the home, and the children are psychic enough to pick them up and suffer.
Just as the two world wars took women out of the home, so did another recent change affect mankind. When the automobile came, people forgot about breeding. The automobile did one terrible thing: it made people forget how to breed and how to take care of one another. When people had horses, horses were a part of the family. People had to care for their horses and in the process learned to care for one another. People also had to breed their horses, and in that process learned about the value of intelligent breeding. In those days, you often heard of the "well-bred" person. You don't hear of the well-bred person anymore. People no longer consider that humans, too, are involved in the natural process of breeding. They have become forgetful of these important laws, and this has led to lack of discipline, to bodies indiscriminately creating more bodies. Who is living in them nobody quite knows. That's what we, as a society, forgot when the automobile replaced the horse. When you had a horse, you had to feed it, you had to train it, curry it, stable it and breed it. In breeding it, you had to choose a stud for your mare or find a suitable mare for your stallion. The qualities on both sides were closely observed, and the combination of genetics consciously planned. It was, therefore, natural for people in those days to seek proper mates for their children, and the results were the vital, creative and industrious children of the children. As a civilization, we are slowly forgetting such things, being more careless about our children's future, about their lives and minds.
Well, what's more important than the child? He needs 24-hour-a-day care. He is learning to walk, to speak, to think. He falls down and needs consoling. He catches the flu and needs to be nursed back to health. It is the mother's duty to provide that care. No one else is going to do it for her. No one else can do it for her. She brought that child into the world, and she must prepare that child for a positive and rewarding life. If the farmer neglects his animals, he creates a karma. The animals suffer. The farm suffers. The community suffers when the farm fails, and the man himself suffers. There is a grave karma, too, for the woman who neglects her stri dharma, who goes out into the world and does not nurture the physical, emotional, intellectual and spiritual needs of her children. She knows this within herself, but she may be influenced by ill-advised people, or by a mass movement that tells her that she has only one life to live and that she cannot find fulfillment in the home but must express herself, venture out, seek her own path, her own fortune. You have all heard these ideas. I tell you that they are wrong. They spell the disillusionment of the mother who heeds them, then the disintegration of the family that is sacrificed by her absence. Finally, they result in her own unhappiness as she despairs at the loss suffered by her family and herself.
From the point of view of the Second World, or astral plane, the home is the family temple, and the wife and mother is in charge of that spiritual environment. Man can come into that sanctum sanctorum but should not bring the world into it. He will naturally find a refuge in the home if she is doing her duty. He will be able to regain his peace of mind there, renew himself for the next day in the stressful situations that the world is full of. In this technological age a man needs this refuge. He needs that inner balance in his life. When he enters that sanctuary and she is in her soul body and the child is in its soul body, then he becomes consciously conscious in his soul body. He leaves the conscious mind, which is a limited, external state of mind and not a balanced state of mind. He enters the intuitive mind. He gets immediate and intuitive answers to his worldly problems. How can he not be successful in his purusha dharma in the outside world when he has the backing of a good wife? She is naturally perceptive, naturally intuitive. She balances out his intellect, softens the impact of the forces which dash against his nervous system from morning to night. Encouragement and love naturally radiate out from her as she fulfills stri dharma. Without these balancing elements in his life, a man becomes too externalized, too instinctive and sometimes brutal.
In the home the mother is likened to the Shakti Deity. She is the power of the home. None other. So she has to be there. She has to be treated right. She has to be given the things she needs. It is the man's duty to provide for her and for the children. The husband should provide her with all the fine things, with a good house which she then makes into a home, with gold and jewels and clothes, gold hanging down until her ears hurt, more bracelets, more things to keep her in the home so she is feeling secure and happy. In return she provides a refuge, a serene corner of the world where he can escape from the pressures of daily life, where he can regain his inner perspective, perform his spiritual sadhana and meditations then enjoy his family. Thus, she brings happiness and peace of mind to the family, to the community and to the world.
This working together of the home and the temple brings up the culture and the religion within the family. The family goes to the temple; the temple blesses the family's next project. The mother returns home. She keeps an oil lamp burning in the shrine room on the altar. It's a beautiful thing. All this happens because her astral body is not fretted by the stresses and strains of a worldly life, not polluted by the lustful thoughts of other men directed to her. She is not living in the emotional astral body. She is living in her peaceful soul body of love, fulfilling her dharma and radiating the soulful presence called sannidhya. She was born to be a woman, and that's how a woman should behave.
The Christian-Judaic-Islamic idea of a one life, that "you have to get everything out of this life because when you're gone, you're gone, so grab all the gusto that you can out of life" has given the modern Western woman the idea that she is not getting what she should, by being a woman, and therefore the world looks doubly attractive because she is just passing through and will never come back and doesn't want to miss anything. So, living a man's life is very, very attractive. She doesn't want to stay home all the time and not see anything, not meet anybody, go through the boredom of raising a family, taking care of the children. She wants to be out with life, functioning in a man's world because she is told that she is missing something. Therefore, you can understand her desire to get out and work, start seeing and experiencing life and mixing with people, meeting new people. The Hindu woman does not look at life like that. The Hindu woman knows that she was born in a woman's body--this soul has taken an incarnation for a time in a woman's body--to perform a dharma, to perform a duty for the evolution of the soul. The duty is to be a mother to her children, wife to her husband, to strengthen the home and the family, which are the linchpin of society. She knows that the rewards are greater for her in the home. She knows that all she is missing is a man's strenuous work and responsibility, that her stri dharma is equally as great as a man's purusha dharma, even though they are quite different by nature. Because she knows these things, she fulfills her dharma joyously.
Now, a woman may wonder, "If I don't work, how are we going to pay the bills?" The real reason that most women work is economic. The economy of the world is becoming more and more difficult, and the first answer to money problems, especially in the West, where the family unit is not too strong these days, is to have the woman go to work. This is an unhappy solution. The sacrifices are greater than the rewards. It is a false economy. Many times I have told young wives to stay home with their children. They worry. Their husbands worry. But with the wife at home, working to strengthen her husband, he soon becomes confident, creative, energetic. He is reinspired and always finds a way to make things work.
As long as the mother is home, everything is fine. There is security. Without this security, a family begins to disintegrate. Just think how insecure a child is without its mother. When the mother is there, security reigns in the home. As long as the mother is home doing whatever she naturally does as a mother--she doesn't even have to read a book about how to do it--the husband has to support the home. He feels bound to support the home.
The Hindu woman knows that she is born in a woman's body to perform a woman's dharma, to perform her duty and not to emulate the men. The duty is to be a mother to her children and a wife to her husband, whom she looks to as her lord. She performs that duty willingly as does the man perform his duty which arises out of being born in a man's body. The Hindu woman is trained to perform her stri dharma from the time she is a little girl. She finds ways to express her natural creativity within the home itself. She may write poetry or become an artist. Perhaps she has a special talent for sewing or embroidery or gardening or music. She can learn to loom cloth and make the family's clothing. If needed, she can use her skills to supplement the family income without leaving the home. There are so many ways for a Hindu wife and mother to fully use her creative energies, including being creative enough to never let her life become boring. It is her special blessing that she is free to pursue her religion fully, to study the scriptures, to sing bhajana and keep her own spiritual life strong inside.
Then there is the situation in which the wife is working for her husband in the home. This is not ideal, but it is far better than having her out, away from her husband, under another man's mind. At least the family is working together toward a single goal, and the mother is there to care for the child and answer questions. Of course, if working in the home does not allow for closeness of mother and children, then it is to be avoided--if, for instance, the work is so demanding that the mother is never free to play with the young ones or is so pressured by her other duties that she becomes tense and upset. Otherwise, it is a positive situation. From the child's point of view, mother is home. She is there to answer questions, to make a dosai or say "Go make yourself a nice dosai."
Pollachi Consultants & Advisors
http://www.pollachiconsultants.com/ : "It's a Family Business. You are part of it !"
Growing together as a couple
We all know that it is not easy to keep the sweetness of the initial relationship alive when demands from work and family keep mounting on us. Our daily lives can become a routine of work and we wonder where is the sweetness that we first experienced? It is worth checking from time to time if we are growing together or growing apart.
Often it is easy to lose perspective of life when we are so busy. Remind each other what is important in your life. For example if small events are creating stress in your family, remind yourself that in the long run what matters to you is the sweetness within family.
Mother Meera
Mother Meera was born on December 26, 1960 in the village of Chandepalle in southern India. She soon showed herself to be an unusual child: by the age of three She would report "going to various lights." Her parents treated Her as an exceptional child and loved Her very much. Her family was not especially religious and She was not brought up in any tradition. Her real parents were the spiritual guides that She met in vision; it was from these that She received the love and help She needed. The state of samadhi was constant for Her. Under the auspices of Her uncle, Mr.Reddy, She lived for some time in Pondicherry where Her extraordinary presence attracted considerable attention. She married a German in 1982 and he stays with the Mother. She presently lives in Thalheim, a quiet village in Germany. Although She has not sought publicity, thousands of people from all over the world come to receive Her darshan, her silent bestowal of grace and light through Her gaze and touch. Mother Meera is worshipped as the Divine Mother in India.
Life in Perspective
One day a father of a very wealthy family took his son on a trip to the
very poor family.
Adoption
My point of view on http://directory.google.com/Top/Home/Family/Adoption/
Life
http://timharford.com/2018/05/statistics-fast-and-slow/ - A new book by the late Hans Rosling and his family, Factfulness (UK) (US), advocates the merits of understanding the world both through the data and through personal experience — not of news stories or tourist traps, but of the everyday lives being lived all over the world. “Numbers will never tell the full story of what life on Earth is all about,” wrote Rosling, despite being the world’s most famous statistical guru. But the story they do tell matters. In statistics, as elsewhere, hard logic and personal impressions work best when they reinforce and correct each other.
Food
http://www.foodfamilyfarming.org/
What is your goal in this life?
Are you spiritually ready? Have you done your duty to your family? Have
Sacred Thread
The three cords are tied together by a knot called Brahma-granthi, which symbolises Brahma, Vishnu and Siva (the trinity of gods, Creator, Sustainer and Destroyer). Besides, extra knots are made in the cords to indicate the various Pravaras of a particular family.
Brahmin
[Osho] : ...The mother had become very old, but she had waited and waited and waited. And she said: "You have proved, Satyakam, that truth is always victorious. And you have proved that a brahmin is not born, a brahmin is a quality to be achieved. Everybody by his birth is a sudra -- because everybody's birth is the same. One has to prove by purifying himself, by crystallizing himself, by becoming centered and enlightened, that he is a brahmin. Just to be born into the family of a brahmin does not make you a brahmin."...
Christianity
...we soon came to feel that Jesus' way must be a practical one: he had shown us a way of life that was comprised of more than a concern for the soul. It was a way that simply said, "If you have two coats, give one to him who has none. Give food to the hungry, and do not turn away your neighbor when he needs to borrow from you. When you are asked for an hour's work, give two. Strive for justice. If you wish to found a family, see that all others who want to found a family are able to do so, too. If you wish for education, work, and satisfying activity, make these possible for other people as well. If you claim that it is your duty to care for your health, then accept this duty on behalf of others too. Treat people in the same way that you would like to be treated by them. That is the wisdom of the law and the prophets. Finally, enter through this narrow gate, for it is the way that leads
The University of Hard Knocks
family. I believe in your Inside, not in your Outside, whoever you
to suit myself. I sat in the highest chair in the family circle. I
That day they had the little joy and sunshine of the family in his
over and rub it on the little joy and sunshine of the family, who
family to keep. But I would teach him a lesson not to "monkey" with
Then I got a confidential letter from a friend of our family I had
was a friend of our family. "You have been selected because you are
money for Tom, the friend of our family. But I see now I need not
interest I know he is no friend of our family.
these years to support a home and care for her family. She had kept
The mass of the human family never go on south far enough to
The big squeeze
"Any proposal to vastly increase U.S. imports in anything has to be analyzed in its impact on the environment, trade deficit, family income and farm families," Ritchie said.
Family
[Words] > Family
http://www.foodfamilyfarming.org/
Kalpana Chawla
a family sheds its tears
Ten ways to enhance your family dinnertime
[Health] > Ten ways to enhance your family dinnertime
But we forget the high price in terms of health and happiness that is being paidwhen dinners are undermined. Besides, a lot can be gained when dinner times are treated as special times. Treat your dinnertime as a sacred time for you and yourfamily and you will see the rewards right away.
This is similar to the point made earlier. Offering your food to the family deity can bring a sense of sacredness to your meals. In Hindu philosophy, food (anna)holds a sacred place. Treating food that is going to nourish you, with respect makes sense. This is especially important for young children to learn in times when their choice seems to rule on the dinner table.
This works very well if your family consists of young, school-going children. Pre-assign dinner topics such as current events every Monday, new science invention every Tuesday and have everyone say something about the topic. Be careful not to turn this into a one-sided lecture. There is so much learning that happens through these topics. Be creative about these topics: music, science, politics, family, health, and food.... the list can be endless.
Although this is obvious and has been covered in the points above, I wanted to bring special attention to this. For one, this happens more often than not. It should be a ground rule in any family that whoever has prepared this food has put a lot of time, energy and love into the food. Criticizing the food is like insulting someone who has gone out of his or her way to make this food for your consumption.
Ekambara Sastrigal
do)along with Sanskrit scholars and family members. He returned on 13/04/2003
Selfish
feels angry. Because they were born into a royal family: they were warriors, their
Robert Blackwill
Indian family values, which I admire as essential
family, loved ones, friends. They each have a name.
Parenting
Everyone wants to think that they are good parents and that their particular parenting techniques are the most effective. However, you must realize that kids are not just raised by their parents; they are also raised in large part by their environment. Environment includes their neighborhood, school, peers, and media such as television, music, and the Internet. And don't forget that children differ in those things you might call genes. Thus, a parenting strategy that raises Ivy League angels in one family might lead to depressed psychotic sociopaths in another. It's good to listen to the advice of other people who are parents (see Tip #10: More knowledge is always better), but realize that you do not have full control of your children's upbringing. They are at the mercy of their environment - their social context - most of the time. I believe that the most effective parenting strategy is to first realize that parenting is a highly context-sensitive problem and that the context (environment) must be taken into serious consideration during the parenting process. You can't raise your kids in an isolated cave (unless you're a caveman).
Puthucode
For feeding of devotees on Navarathri days, several families of the village have bequethed land to the Devaswom in the days gone by. For example the feeding on the 6th day has been traditionally done in the name of “Nanupattar Sadya” whose family has endowed land to the Devaswom for this purpose.
20050114
HT: We see a breakdown of the family, especially both parents working.
the balance in the family. The root of the problem is materialism.
family understand the value of money and the value of happiness, they
in the family.
Erin Pavlina
http://www.vegfamily.com/blog/
[The People Behind the Businesses|http://www.vegfamily.com/blog/index.php?p=11] : ...I’ve been running a vegan business for over 5 years and I’ve met some truly wonderful people in this industry. I wonder how many of you know how dedicated and caring some of these people are...
Plantar Fasciitis
[American Family Physician: Treatment of Plantar Fasciitis|http://www.aafp.org/afp/20010201/467.html]
Farming
http://www.foodfamilyfarming.org/
Farm from the Madding Crowd - http://sewcot854.blogspot.com/ : ..Originally from the UK, I came to Japan almost 10 years ago as a teacher for a large eikaiwa (English language conversation school). I now run my own small school and work with my wife and her family on their vegetable farm. I still haven't returned to the UK (not even for a holiday) and probably never will. Oh well, it's as good a place as any to live and die. And there's lots of rice..
Habit
31 Simple Family Pleasures and Why They’re All That Matter - http://www.zenfamilyhabits.net/2009/10/31-simple-family-pleasures-and-why-theyre-all-that-matter/
20130727
He that maintains his family by the foulest means will be considered respectable. Dharma will be observed only for exhibition.
Over small matters, members of the same family will fight their own blood relations, even unto death, forgetting all ties of affection.
Now-20180719
Life : [Yoga] [Family] / [Friends] / [Death] / [Heaven] / [Hell]
# Steve Blakeman - Are you 'weird' if you don't use Social Media? - https://www.linkedin.com/pulse/you-weird-dont-use-social-media-steve-blakeman/ ... One of my closest pals chooses to abstain from all forms of social interaction online. He is smart, funny and gregarious so it isn't like he has nothing interesting to impart. He is also not a technophobe either given that he has worked in the tech industry for his entire career, so he certainly isn't a luddite. He just doesn't feel the need to divulge every aspect of his life with friends and family - he would rather have a chat, face-to-face if possible and if not then via a good old fashioned phone call. And, let's be honest, is there anything wrong with that? ...
Now-20180725
Life : [Yoga] [Family] / [Friends] / [Death] / [Heaven] / [Hell]
# Steve Blakeman - Are you 'weird' if you don't use Social Media? - https://www.linkedin.com/pulse/you-weird-dont-use-social-media-steve-blakeman/ ... One of my closest pals chooses to abstain from all forms of social interaction online. He is smart, funny and gregarious so it isn't like he has nothing interesting to impart. He is also not a technophobe either given that he has worked in the tech industry for his entire career, so he certainly isn't a luddite. He just doesn't feel the need to divulge every aspect of his life with friends and family - he would rather have a chat, face-to-face if possible and if not then via a good old fashioned phone call. And, let's be honest, is there anything wrong with that? ...
Important
Family / Friends
2018-09-09
So, if you’re struggling, know that I am too. I’m struggling to wrap my brain around our potential next steps. It hurts, it’s ridiculously humbling, & I’m scared out of my mind. But in my weakness God is strong. And I will try to remind myself to BEHOLD his light & love for me & my family in all of this, praying that he’ll bring me peace & joy I can’t possibly muster on my own. And I pray the same thing for you today as well. You are not alone. And neither am I ...
LifeWithoutPrinciple
Government and legislation! these I thought were respectable professions. We have heard of heaven-born Numas, Lycurguses, and Solons, in the history of the world, whose names at least may stand for ideal legislators; but think of legislating to regulate the breeding of slaves, or the exportation of tobacco! What have divine legislators to do with the exportation or the importation of tobacco? what humane ones with the breeding of slaves? Suppose you were to submit the question to any son of God- and has He no children in the Nineteenth Century? is it a family which is extinct?- in what condition would you get it again? What shall a State like Virginia say for itself at the last day, in which these have been the principal, the staple productions? What ground is there for patriotism in such a State? I derive my facts from statistical tables which the States themselves have published.
2019
Futureface: A Family Mystery, an Epic Quest, and the Secret to Belonging by Alex Wagner

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