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Stephen Knapp
http://www.stephen-knapp.com/ : This site is for anyone interested in Spiritual Enlightenment, Eastern Philosophy, the Vedas, Vedic Culture, Yoga, Hinduism, Reincarnation and the Science of the Soul, traveling to the holy places of India, Comparative Religion, as well as global unity, peace, cooperation, and more. Here you can find information on the books of the writer, author, philosopher, spiritual practitioner, traveler, photographer, and lecturer Stephen Knapp. His books can easily and quickly help give the insights and knowledge for you to better understand who you are, your spiritual identity, where you come from, where you are going, and the real purpose of life from a spiritual point of view. [Articles|http://www.stephen-knapp.com/articles_to_read.htm]
HEARTICULTURE
[Articles] > HEARTICULTURE
Gurudeva
volume, titled Living with Siva, Hinduism's Contemporary Culture, arrived
children their Saivite Hindu religion, preserving traditional culture and
Azim Premji's Success Recipe
Globalisation has brought in people of different origin, different upbringing and different cultures together. Ability to become an integral part of a cross-cultural team will be a must for your success.
Why so much conflict between the different religions?
But this is not only so with the Christians, Jews, Mohammedans and Hindus; it is exactly the same with all the people that have existed up to now. The racial ego, the religious ego, the spiritual ego is far more dangerous than the individual ego, because the individual ego is gross. You can see it -- everybody can see it, it is so visible on the surface. But when the ego becomes racial -- "Hinduism is great" -- you don't think you are claiming anything for yourself. Indirectly you are claiming, "I am great because I am a Hindu, and Hinduism is great." This is an indirect way, a subtle, cunning way: "I am great because I am a Japanese, because Japanese are the direct descendants of the sun God"; or, "I am a Chinese and the Chinese are the most civilized people, the most cultured."
There is something which does not allow us to grow into sane human beings. In our very conditioning are the seeds of insanity. Every child is born sane, and then, slowly slowly, we civilize him -- we call it the process of civilization. We prepare him to become part of the great culture, the great church, the great state to which we belong.
Is there a law of karma?
Now, there are many things implied in this. First, What is good? Each society defines good according to itself. What is good to a Jew is not good to a Jaina; what is good to a Christian is not good to a Confucian. Not only that, what is good in one culture is bad in another culture. A law has to be universal. For example, if you heat water to one hundred degrees centigrade, it will evaporate -- in Tibet, in Russia, in America, even in Oregon. In Oregon it will be a little puzzled, but all the same at one hundred degrees water will evaporate. Certainly the law of karma is neither a scientific law nor part of any legal system.
Obstacles to Happiness
become famous. Our society and culture drill that into our heads day and
contaminated by the stupidity of society and culture. To acquire happiness you don't have to do anything, because happiness cannot be acquired. Does
Cool Tools
Someday, I want to use the [natural|http://www.arab.net/saudi/culture/sa_miswak.html] Toothbrush
Weblog2001December
I have read somewhere that the Western World follow a 'parts per million' culture while the Japanese follow the 'zero defect' culture... and that this is the fundamental difference !
[Ian Strecker] : [Toward a Zero-Defect Culture|http://www.slb.com/ir/news/strecker6_96.html]
Pongal
As already mentioned, this is the Pongal festival in South India. It is closely connected with agriculture. To the agriculturalist, it is a day of triumph. He would have by then brought home the fruits of his patient toil. Symbolically, the first harvest is offered to the Almighty—and that is Pongal. To toil was his task, his duty, but the fruit is now offered to Him—that is the spirit of Karma Yoga.
When you celebrate the Shankranti or Pongal in this manner, your sense of value changes. You begin to understand that your real wealth is the goodwill and friendship of your relatives, friends, neighbours and servants; that your wealth is the land on which your food grows, the cattle which help you in agriculture, and the cow which gives you milk. You begin to have greater love and respect for them and for all living beings—the crows, the fish and all other creatures.
Sarvepalli Radhakrishnan
[Books] : [Religion and Culture]
ShreeRamanavami
None but the righteous can be truly happy. None but he who has the correct sense of duty and the will for its implementation can be said to live worthily. One must be imbued with a definite conviction about the supremacy of moral principles, ethical values and spiritual ideals. These ought to guide one’s day-to-day actions and serve as powerful means for the culture of the human personality. That is the purpose of life. That is the way to Self-realisation. That is the message and the mission of Lord Rama’s fife on earth.
Pancha Ganapati
of Lord Ganesha, the elephant-headed lord of culture and the arts.
commercialism but to further the great Hindu culture. Clearly, killer
Arts and Guardian of Culture, discussing Hindu Dharma and making plans
Weblog2002January
[Rebecca Blood] [:|http://www.rebeccablood.net/archive/2002/01.html#07e] "I think you may be interested in [viviculture]: it is weblog as an exercise in mindfulness. Kurt's statement of principles especially resonates with me."
[Alan Kay] is enraptured by the potential impact that computing technology can have on the world. He is especially interested in education and hopes that this new technology will create, what he calls, a "skeptical man." He likens the personal computer to the present day book and believes that if everyone had access to a computer, people would be more prone to play "what-if" games with information. He says that "the [information] retrieval systems of the future are not going to retrieve facts but points of view. The weakness of databases is that they let you retrieve facts, while the strength of our culture over the past several hundred years has been our ability to take on multiple points of view. It should be possible for every kid everywhere to test what he or she is being told either against arguments of others or by appeal to computer simulation. The question is: will society nurture that potential or suppress it?"
SAP
# Culture of the company & country
Wendell Berry
In 1963, he taught at New York University. When Berry was offered and accepted a teaching position in the English Department at the University of Kentucky, the Berry's came home to Henry County in Kentucky. He lives on a 125 acre farm where his family has lived since the early 1800's. According to Bryan Wooley, "Berry is the fifth generation of his father's family and the sixth of his mother's to farm in Henry County, in the neighborhood of Port Royal" (8). Although his wife, formerly Tanya Amyx, lived in the city all her life, she and her husband raised their two children, Mary Dee and Pryor (Den) Clifford, on the farm. In the article "Wendell Berry, A Kentucky Writer Tries to Strengthen the Ties Between Man and the Land," Wooley discusses Berry's farm life. Berry did not initially intend to live on this farm but intended to use it as a vacation place. Instead the Berry's renovated the house and moved in around July 4, 1965. "It is a real farm, not a writer-professor's country estate. Its chores include milking cows and currying horses, and mucking out stalls and mending fences and mowing hay and all other time-consuming sometimes back-breaking, labor that family agriculture requires" (10).
Work
[Culture]
Religion and Culture
[Books] > Religion and Culture
viviculture
[Words] > viviculture
http://www.viviculture.org/
The Hand That Rocks The Cradle Rules the World
Don't forget that in the East the ties of the extended family are very close. Women live in a community, surrounded by younger and older women, often living in the same house. They enjoy a rewarding life which includes helping the younger ones and being helped by those who are more mature. Several generations work together in sharing the joys as well as the burdens of household culture. It is different in the West. Women here usually do not have the advantages of close association with other family members. Naturally, they become a little lonely, especially if they do not have a religious community of friends. They get lonely and want to get out in the world and enjoy life a little. This is another reason women leave the home. It is very unfortunate.
This working together of the home and the temple brings up the culture and the religion within the family. The family goes to the temple; the temple blesses the family's next project. The mother returns home. She keeps an oil lamp burning in the shrine room on the altar. It's a beautiful thing. All this happens because her astral body is not fretted by the stresses and strains of a worldly life, not polluted by the lustful thoughts of other men directed to her. She is not living in the emotional astral body. She is living in her peaceful soul body of love, fulfilling her dharma and radiating the soulful presence called sannidhya. She was born to be a woman, and that's how a woman should behave.
Three visions for India
culture, their history and tried to enforce our way of life on them.
Vision Creates Great Leaders
technology packages in the core sectors such as agriculture
agro food processing, food and agriculture, healthcare, electric
competence for an integrated action:(1) Agriculture and food
and agricultural production. Other areas of agriculture and agro
Ram Dass
American counterculture was attracted to Ram Dass who explored higher
Schizophrenia
Man is split. Schizophrenia is a normal condition of man--at least now. It may not have been so in the primitive world, but centuries of conditioning, civilization, culture and religion have made man a crowd--divided, split, contradictory.... But because this split is against his nature, deep down somewhere hidden the unity still survives. Because the soul of man is one, all the conditionings at the most destroy the periphery of the man. But the center remains untouched--that's how man continues to live. But his life has become a hell. The whole effort of Zen is how to drop this schizophrenia, how to drop this split personality, how to drop the divided mind of man, how to become undivided, integrated, centered, crystallized. The way you are, you cannot say that you are. You don't have a being. You are a marketplace--many voices. If you want to say 'yes', immediately the 'no' is there. You cannot even utter a simple word 'yes' with totality.... In this way happiness is not possible; unhappiness is a natural consequence of a split personality.
International Children's Digital Library
When it is completed in about 5 years, the International Children's Digital Library will hold about 10,000 children's books from 100 cultures targeted at children from 3 to 13. Built by the Internet Archive, the largest library on the Internet and the University of Maryland's Human-Computer Interaction Lab, worldwide supporters include the Bibliotheca Alexandrina, the Finnish Institute for Children's Literature: Helsinki University Library; National Library Board of Singapore; National Library of Croatia; Swiss Institute for Child and Youth Media; the Swiss National Library; the National Library of New Zealand and the Zimbabwe Book Council. Brewster Kahl, digital librarian of the Internet Archive said universal access to all human knowledge and culture is within our grasps. "This project is bringing publishers, librarians and researchers together to make a system that works for children," Kahl said.
The library has books from more than 27 different cultures in more than 15 different languages. And while much of the collection is drawn from the public domain, the library includes about 80 books in copyright from publishers and authors as well as classics such as "Alice in Wonderland" and "Robinson Crusoe," which are no longer under copyright restriction. Access to the site at www.icdlbooks.org initially requires a direct Internet connection, such as a DSL line or a cable modem and service for those connecting by phone modems will be available in the summer 2003.
The University of Hard Knocks
me here on this platform in my graceful and cultured manner, and
We study agriculture from books. That does not make us an
The big squeeze
But Mark Ritchie, president of the Institute for Agriculture and Trade Policy in Minneapolis, said the public and policymakers must think before eliminating tariffs that keep industries in business...
Philip Yancey
[People] > Philip Yancey is editor at large of Christianity Today and cochair of the editorial board for Books and Culture. His books include Reaching for the Invisible God (2000), The Bible Jesus Read (1999), What's So Amazing About Grace? (1998), The Jesus I Never Knew (1995), Where is God When It Hurts (1990), and many others.
Cosmopolitan
The Magick Path of [Tantra] : ...I have, in fact, always though of myself as a cosmopolitan and not limited by any ideas and not part of the social, political or intellectual world. The world is my city; the cosmos my land. The word cosmopolitan was first used by Diogenes, the naked Greek Cynic philosopher about 400 B.C. When will the human race grow up to recognise that there are many people who are not nationalists and want to be free of labels and locations? Why, in this modern day and age is it expected that all humans should grow up and conform to the patterns and ideas of the country and zone into which they are born? We are really still a long way from being a civilised and advanced culture...
20030618
[NeoIT] advises companies on how to relocate outside the US a wide range of their IT tasks, from network management to transaction processing. Last year, NeoIT’s fees were 275 million dollars. This year, it surpassed that figure in less than three months. Obviously this is not good news for IT employment. Research company Forrester estimates that 3.3 million service-sector jobs will leave the US for India, Russia, China and the Philippines over the dozen of so years. Associations representing software engineers and the like are angry but at least one industry watcher believes that companies have panicked because of the economy and that all but routine software jobs will return to the US. "Companies aren't thinking through whether long term this is going to be a viable business strategy. It's not easy communicating and coordinating with people of other cultures and other places," University of Southern California business school Professor Ravi Kumar opined to the San Francisco Chronicle.
Masanobu Fukuoka
[The Fukuoka Farming Website|http://www.fukuokafarmingol.net/] - Dedicated to exploring Masanobu Fukuoka's revolutionary method of sustainable agriculture
Takao Furuno
Book : The Power of Duck: Integrated Rice and Duck Farming, by Takao Furuno, was published in 2001 by Tagari Publications of the Permaculture Institute, Tasmania, Australia.
Glacier Express
http://www.mgbahn.ch/glacierexpress1.php : ...On board famous Swiss mountain railways from St. Moritz to Zermatt, from Piz Bernina to the Matterhorn. A 7 1/2 hour railway journey across 291 bridges, through 91 tunnels and across the Oberalp Pass at 2,033 metres in altitude. A panoramic trip through the Alps in the heart of Switzerland. The Glacier Express: also the most beautiful route between the sights of the Graubünden holiday region, central Switzerland, including Vierwaldstättersee (Lake Lucerne) and Lucerne itself, the sunny Wallis area with its glacier landscape, and the exciting regions of the South. Travel in comfort through the unspoilt natural beauty of a landscape rich in ancient, fragrant mountain forests, peaceful Alpine meadows, rushing mountain streams and mountain valleys, rich in tradition and centuries-old culture.
Mailam
[Mailam: A Murukan temple at the crossroads of myth and local culture|http://murugan.org/research/hernault.htm]
Robert Blackwill
exquisite culture of Kolkata; the flowers and forests
Anuradha Choudry
A highly motivated Sanskrit scholar dedicated to understanding the deeper sense of the Vedas and to promoting Sanskrit as a living, modern, spoken language. Thereby seeking to create awareness about Bharat’s rich culture and to help restore a sense of pride about her invaluable heritage.
When asked about her hobbies, she cannot resist mentioning, “speaking and making others speak Sanskrit!” besides, dancing (Kathak & Folk Dances), acting, painting, travelling, understanding other cultures, playing football and camping.
Culture
[Words] > Culture
http://www.palantirtech.com/careers/culture
Rutger Kortenhorst
You can put a mass of knowledge into the world, but that will not do it much good. There must come some culture into the blood. We all know in modern times of nations which have masses of knowledge, but what of them? They are like tigers; they are like savages, because culture is not there. Knowledge is only skin-deep, as civilization is, and a little scratch brings out the old savage. Such things happen; this is the danger. Teach the masses in the vernaculars, give them ideas; they will get information, but something more is necessary; give them culture.
LifeWithoutPrinciple
If we have thus desecrated ourselves- as who has not?- the remedy will be by wariness and devotion to reconsecrate ourselves, and make once more a fane of the mind. We should treat our minds, that is, ourselves, as innocent and ingenuous children, whose guardians we are, and be careful what objects and what subjects we thrust on their attention. Read not the Times. Read the Eternities. Conventionalities are at length as had as impurities. Even the facts of science may dust the mind by their dryness, unless they are in a sense effaced each morning, or rather rendered fertile by the dews of fresh and living truth. Knowledge does not come to us by details, but in flashes of light from heaven. Yes, every thought that passes through the mind helps to wear and tear it, and to deepen the ruts, which, as in the streets of Pompeii, evince how much it has been used. How many things there are concerning which we might well deliberate whether we had better know them- had better let their peddling-carts be driven, even at the slowest trot or walk, over that bride of glorious span by which we trust to pass at last from the farthest brink of time to the nearest shore of eternity! Have we no culture, no refinement- but skill only to live coarsely and serve the Devil?- to acquire a little worldly wealth, or fame, or liberty, and make a false show with it, as if we were all husk and shell, with no tender and living kernel to us? Shall our institutions be like those chestnut burs which contain abortive nuts, perfect only to prick the fingers?
With respect to a true culture and manhood, we are essentially provincial still, not metropolitan- mere Jonathans. We are provincial, because we do not find at home our standards; because we do not worship truth, but the reflection of truth; because we are warped and narrowed by an exclusive devotion to trade and commerce and manufactures and agriculture and the like, which are but means, and not the end.
Lieutenant Herndon, whom our government sent to explore the Amazon, and, it is said, to extend the area of slavery, observed that there was wanting there "an industrious and active population, who know what the comforts of life are, and who have artificial wants to draw out the great resources of the country." But what are the "artificial wants" to be encouraged? Not the love of luxuries, like the tobacco and slaves of, I believe, his native Virginia, nor the ice and granite and other material wealth of our native New England; nor are "the great resources of a country" that fertility or barrenness of soil which produces these. The chief want, in every State that I have been into, was a high and earnest purpose in its inhabitants. This alone draws out "the great resources" of Nature, and at last taxes her beyond her resources; for man naturally dies out of her. When we want culture more than potatoes, and illumination more than sugar-plums, then the great resources of a world are taxed and drawn out, and the result, or staple production, is, not slaves, nor operatives, but men- those rare fruits called heroes, saints, poets, philosophers, and redeemers.

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